The Basilia Phalanstère

The Basilia Phalanstère was located at 1016 Madison Ave, Central Business District, in Sidume, of Pentapolis of the Valley.  It is six floors high, with a basement to make seven; and worth $32 million with taxes at about $80,000, for 93,300 square feet with elevators.  The building had been zoned for commercial and residential usage.  From outside the building looked elegant and stately, a large stone and brick home amidst the concrete of Sidume and its buildings.  It looked like something that belonged closer to the opulence of Biell than so near the economic center of The Valley.

Blithedale built the mansion in 1862, at the foot of the ultramarine Acadian Mountains, a sprawling granite structure; the land had been bought in the early 1850s.  Throughout time The Basilia was reconstructed and remodeled primarily in 1865 thru 1914, to include four fort-like towers shooting out from its sides and amongst the steel skyscrapers, like octopus tentacles around glass fish.  It contains 35 apartments, 9 studios, 9 duplex penthouses, museum, business, and dining facilities; and can house up to 1620 people at any given moment.  The building’s main door was large steel arches, framed by a single stone arch that read, “O to che vieni doloroso.”

The structure was composed of three major parts: a central part and two lateral wings.  The central wing houses libraries, offices, meeting rooms, studies, and a ballroom.  The left wing is for labor and noisy activities, such as carpentry or food preparation; as well as dorms for Erotes.  The right wing is where most member penthouses were.  The basement housed some of the organization’s more monetarily expensive acquisitions.

Its unique architecture was preserved by the 1914 Green-Space Initiative, for more modernity’s sake. With the mass production of the automobile, increasing traffic, demolition of historic buildings, commercial encroachment into historic neighborhoods, and the loss of open space led to the beginning of grass roots preservation efforts. Almost immediately residents, business people, and government officials worked cooperatively to preserve, enhance, and revitalize the eastern side of Wuthering Canal; they successfully restored numerous village buildings, the establishment of a historic preservation district.  Interiors and features were as modern as could be afforded.

 

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Dorian at Aerynd University

While attending Aerynd University I avoided most social circles, believing they’d peak beneath my mask and judge me inappropriate – or worse, inadequate.  Around friends, I remained shy as if they were strangers because facades kept everyone at an arm’s length.  It was simpler to cover my self-consciousness and inferiority beneath masks, that were fashioned for inclusion by adopting specific friend-interests, and sub-cultures, and abandoning my own.  I made myself look like a light skinned gypsy with the manners of a gentleman.  I brought what I learned from Blithedale, to be a person, anyone could share their sordid family life with.

I attended Aerynd University’s art’s conservatory, The Waterfront Annex, from 2047-2051; none of the traditional professional studies interested me so I constructed my own on graphic fiction.

While attending Aerynd University, in Biell, I appeared in final project student films “Noh” by Johann Tronberg and “Chimera” by F. Rohrbach.  I began dating Jeremy Schwach.  While I studied graphic fiction, Jeremy majored in music & production to be a DJ.  At the Annex 2051 Graduation Show, Jeremy’s composition “Megalodon,” retold the global environmental impact of the Monolith’s electromagnetic storms in 2012 & 2103.  The depth of his work became the talk of the University, which had promised him a serious future that failed to materialize.  Instead, my graduating short story cycle, Snow, was a collaborative effort with Ian Jimenez, who provided static and sequential mixed-media illustration for my stories, yielded a Tilael Publishing contract for my original graphic-serial Babalon’s War; Ian’s woodcarving illustrations garnered him an agent.

The success of Snow gave me the ability to move into the Langham, in Caentibiry, amongst vagabonds, ecchi, socialists, and anarchists; rather than go home after graduation.

Blithedale

Blithedale is an entertainment cabal with involvement in projects as varied as fashion houses, publishing companies, cabarets, propagandapapers, television stations, etc…

It began with the orgiastic religion of Dionysos.  Within the Dionysiac cult, money in principle played no part, or played only a secondary role – like a sickness of the body.  Those who took part in Dionysiac orgies were often have nots, sometimes even slaves.  They were a small group of people that refused to cast eroticism out of religion, men had reduced religion to a utilitarian morality.  Eroticism, having lost its sacred character, became unclean.  The popularity of Dionysos in the first centuries of the Roman Empire was such that his cult might have been considered a serious rival to Christianity.  On the other hand, the later existence of a soberer Dionysiansim, seems to indicate that the fear of derangement forced those faithful to Dionysos to renounce the virulence of earlier times.  To the extent that Christianity ruled the world, it attempted to liberate it of eroticism, it turned paradise into the world of immediate – as well as eternal – satisfaction.  But first it made paradise the outcome of an effort, the outcome of labor.  Those that did not chose to conform their violently religious ways found acceptance in the Christian sect of Catharism, calling themselves Blithedale.

They had left on the Mayflower to come to America.  At first the Blithedale members thought they’d get along with the other Mayflower passengers, but they were wrong.  After only a annual and a half at Plymouth the Blithedale members left to set up their original idea.  They envisioned a populace of liberal intellect and cultivated personalities, where interpersonal relations that fostered a more wholesome and simple life could be cultivated away from the energy depleting competitive constitutions.

They moved their community and abbey eight miles east of Boston.  Remaining a isolated community as well as self-sufficient allowed them to amass a small community fortune.  The prototype Blithedale community was originally financed by the sale of stock, a purchaser of one share automatically becoming a member of the institute, which was governed by a board of directors. The profits, if any, were divided into several shares corresponding to the total number of man-days of labour, every member entitled to one share for each day’s labour performed.  During the Panic of 1837, that shut banks and closed lines of credit, Blithedale was the only organization – aside from the Catholic Church – with the resources to give out such vast loans, leaving them to be one of the only money lending agencies around.  In the following depression Blithedale acquired the thousands of abandoned acres of agricultural land as people hoped factory work might save them, and turned the land into resorts of the wealthy.

By the 1840s there was obvious immigration toward towns, cities, and factories.  Hoping to increase its newfound power base Blithedale took advantage of the rapidly developing industrialization made possible by steam and iron mechatronics, by introducing the barons to Blithedale’s inner most rituals for passage to Heaven.  Once a month the most senior members meet for orgies, and wine, and various other indulgences.  Each one a way to purge their souls of sin so they could easily return to their holy lives, unencumbered by being human.  The earliest members were grateful for their free pass to Heaven and they left fortunes, trusts and seedlings for FORBES’ 500 companies.

With its near unprecedented accumulation of capital in the hands of a powerful few, the new mechatronics, city tenements, over-crowded factory town-cities, Blithedale joined other philanthropic organizations to attempt the cultivation of the arts, protection of prostitutes, and the care of orphans.  To clean up any of the rumors that haunted Blithedale since they separated from the Mayflower.  But Blithedale’s good deeds bred just as many rumors.

Dorian & Brent

Immediately after my sixteenth birthday, I left the flotillas and headed to the family estate in Pentapolis of the Valley.  I was determined to attend Aerynd University’s Waterfront Annex conservatory.  I backpacked my way across Bharat, working as an Bliethdale artist’s model; I never considered myself the prettiest, but I smiled deceptively locking myself in another mind.

As I crossed Bharat I met an Ascomanni, Brent, who acted as muscle to protect models from overly amorous artists and auteurs.  He was a a few years older than me.  Brent had a strong secure beach body, that had a thick mat of auburn brown chest hair.  Brent was different than the flotilla boys, he engaged in rough-housing, and the closest I knew that summer to camp-adventures.  Overall, being in his company made one feel protected no matter what.  Brent made me feel as if I could tell him I was ecchi and not be thrown in the trash.  I never told him but I like to pretend he knew and was kind to help me.  I wouldn’t have minded if Brent was my first kiss (he wasn’t).

Since Brent was Blithedale security we were all able to go at night, and play in the bars and clubs without being molested by Bharat’s governing class.  With Brent around yacht-parties off the coast became available to us, and were regularly indulged because of the ability to easily procure poppy java and salvia cigarettes.  On one weekend, a group of us models and security were invited to dine and sunbathe on the Blithedale local chairman.  As we were walking the deck to lunch inside, Brent ran up and grabbed me around the waist, to throw both of us into the pool.  I’m a good sport and laughed after catching my breath.  I was flustered and flushed that Brent had been so close to me – with his shirt off no less!

The Blithedale Chairman asked Brent if I was as much a paper weight as I looked.

I was hurt – my emotional high did not even get to last a full moment, let alone minute; I had never heard the term ‘paperweight’ before.

Brent chuckled.  “He’s as light as he looks.”    Brent picked me up again, this time cradled in his arms (swoon!) and – saying “Fun to throw around!” – he again threw me in the water.

After Bharat, I took an ocean-liner back to Biell, in The Valley.

Dorian’s Want for Birthday Parties

The power went out on my block last night, delaying yesterday’s Vagabond Ways themed post.

***

Growing up I wanted a surprise birthday party a home filled with joy and people that wanted to be there – like what I saw in my mom and dad’s old blu-rays.  That dream never come true, even in grade-school when it was mandatory to report to a classmate’s birthday.  What I feared was not getting older, but that no one would come to a birthday for me.  My parents’ constant migration following the Huxia Rejenys flotillas, based upon access to knowledge and culture that would help them in their accumulations, kept my social circle small and intimate to just myself and my books.

While in Huxia, my parents celebrated my sixteenth milestone two months late because they couldn’t be bothered to take time off from research and worship.  I stopped sending invitations and chose to ignore celebration, taking enjoyment only from cards – and then settle for Facebook birthday posts.  My birthday became where I learned to exist within the cracks, becoming the excuse for wanting to avoid any fuss that would draw attention.

Eventually, at 16 I left the flotillas and headed to the family estate in Pentapolis of the Valley, working my way across Bharat as an artist’s model; I never considered myself the prettiest, but I smiled deceptively locking myself in another mind.  After Bharat, I took an ocean-liner back to Biell, in The Valley.  Having graduated high school early I treated what would’ve been senior year as a skip year.  During this time, I hung with the freaks and the wild ones, drank and got into drugs.  I lived hard in every moment. I joined Blithedale, and met Michel Caillois, who I wanted to teach me how everything worked.

At Aerynd University I avoided most social circles, believing they’d peak beneath my mask and judge me inappropriate – or worse, inadequate.  Around friends, I remained shy as if they were strangers because facades kept everyone at an arm’s length.  It was simpler to cover my self-consciousness and inferiority beneath masks, that were fashioned for inclusion by adopting specific friend-interests, and sub-cultures, and abandoning my own.

The Vagabond’s Identity Part 1

My father owned the third largest architecture firm, that was contracted by The Society to redesign Caentibiry Alley.  My mother was a classically trained dancer and teacher.  My parents’ wealth allowed me to grow up in the privileged district of the City of Flowers in Biell.

I spent my childhood in Vargaria and Huxia, where as a family we converted to Rejenys.  Growing up I wanted to be a graphic fiction writer, with stories published in genre collections and periodicals. At 16, I worked my way across Bharat as an artist’s model.  I never considered myself the prettiest, but I smiled deceptively locking myself in another mind.

After Bharat, I took an ocean-liner back to Biell, in The Valley.  Having graduated high school early I treated what would’ve been senior year as a skip year.  During this time, I hung with the freaks and the wild ones, drank and got into drugs.  I lived hard in every moment. I joined Blithedale, and met Michel Caillois, who I wanted to teach me how everything worked. Continue reading “The Vagabond’s Identity Part 1”

Disappearing Acts

art-by-ramon-k-perez-2            Pentapolis of the Valley thrust upward, a giant needle in the landscape seeming inspired by the ancient secrets of the Acadian Mountains to the east and west.  Its buildings looked thrown together, chance addresses and materials amassed in one place and called a city; a shame that the city hadn’t been more planned out in its growth; there were some provisions for modernity.  Several choice main roads that formed a grid across the city were paved over for car usage, the rest remained cobblestone; a monstrous ribcage across the city.  The most drastic changes to architecture ended about a century and a half ago, back with the Great Depression’s onslaught.

It was originally founded in November 8, 1803, on a one-hundred-acre tract of land between the Anapos River and MacLir River, in the Acadian Mountains.  The site was chosen because of three cataracts on the left half of the Anapos River, offering great potential for water power.  As well they could utilize the Anapos and MacLir River, and built Wuthering Canal to connect the two rivers – preparing to build a shipping titan.  In 1817, the Masonric brothers, of Masonric Corps., and other landowners joined with the Hundred Acre Tract to form the Hamlet of Gamoyra.  Also in 1823, the Wuthering Canal between Anapos River and MacLir River was completed, and the North Exchange linking east to the Atlantic Ocean was opened.  By 1830, Sidume population was 9,200 and in 1834, it was re-chartered as a city.

Read the rest of the story by clicking the PDF link below.

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